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Norris & Company Announces August 2011 Top Performing Associates

Norris & Company Real Estate Announces AUGUST 2011 TOP PERFORMING ASSOCIATES Norris & Company Real Estate recently recognized their AUGUST 2011 TOP PERFORMING ASSOCIATES. CHERYL BURGE, JANE SCHWIERING and DEBBIE BELL attained the highest dollar volume of closed sales for the month.  CHERYL BURGE and the team of SHERRY BROWN and REVA BRUGNOLI accomplished the highest number of sales. The highest dollar volume of new listings was achieved by DEBBIE BELL, BETH LIVERS, JANE SCHWIERING and the team of SHERRY BROWN & REVA BRUGNOLI.  Achieving the highest number of new listings was the team of SHERRY BROWN & REVA BRUGNOLI. Since 1974, Norris & Company Real Estate has been widely recognized as Vero Beach’s premier luxury real estate firm specializing in luxury waterfront, Intracoastal, and oceanfront homes, condominiums, and golf communities on Vero’s barrier island and throughout Indian River County. Through their exclusive affiliations, sterling reputation and integrity, Gena Grove and Jane Schwiering along with 35 quality professionals and staff, have created the #1 real estate company in Vero Beach. With over $2.475 billion in sales in the past decade, Norris & Company Real Estate’s platinum service, sophisticated global marketing, and technological advantages sets them apart from many larger companies in Indian River County and has earned them the distinction of being chosen as an Affiliate of both Christie’s International Real Estate and the Board of Regents... Read More

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Hurricane Preparedness ….

Power Outages Learn what to do when the power goes out. •    Consider a generator: These will make your life much easier during a storm, but understand the carbon monoxide risks and that your neighbors might get angry if you won’t share. •    Connect via Twitter and Facebook on your phone: Most local news stations will send updates via FB and Twitter, which you can access on your phone if the power goes out. •    Keep numbers of energy companies handy: Write down or store in your phone the numbers of energy providers so that you can notify them of an outage. •    Know which foods are safe to eat: This guide explains which foods you can thaw and refreeze, how long they’ll last in your refrigerator without power, and which to throw out. •    Use grills and pressure washers outside: Gas grills and generators carry a carbon monoxide risk. •    Stay away from downed power lines: Let trained workers clean up the damage. •    Have a realistic understanding of restoration times: Here you can read estimates of expected restoration times according to the strength of a hurricane. •    Drink lots of water: When it’s hot and you don’t have A/C, drink water to stay cool and hydrated. •    Get your vaccines early: If you’re planning on getting a vaccine soon, do it before the storm, since power outages may... Read More

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Hurricane Preparedness …

Special Needs and Children The elderly, sick, disabled, pregnant women and children all have special needs during hurricanes. •    Minimize stress: Help children cope better by minimizing stressful situations and discussions. •    Limit TV time: Don’t let your kids watch scary footage of the storm on TV. •    Pre-register for special needs shelters: If you think you will have to evacuate and are bringing a special needs or disabled person with you, pre-register to ensure space and adequate care. •    Maintain normal routines: Keeping up with a normal routine helps soothe everyone from babies to adults. •    Call the doctor: Pregnant women and special needs patients should communicate with their doctors to let them know your plan for riding out the storm or evacuating. •    FEMA for Kids: As long as you have power, direct kids to this colorful site that includes games, cartoons, quizzes and information about hurricanes, presented in a friendly manner. •    Contact home health care service: If you use a home health care service, call them and ask them to check on you during and after the storm. •    Answer children’s questions: Welcome questions from children about what to do, what a hurricane is, and how to prepare for it. •    Get older kids to help: School-aged children will feel more prepared and maybe even excited if they’re allowed to help gather blankets and find batteries. •   ... Read More

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First Aid and Food – Hurricane Preparedness

First Aid These first aid items are a must for every household. •    Antiseptic solution: Keep this on hand to keep infections at bay. •    Allergy medicine: Storms can blow in all kinds of icky stuff that drive your allergies wild. •    First aid instructions: Print out instructions for the Heimlich, CPR and other basic aid in case you panic in an emergency. •    Mosquito repellant: If it floods — or even rains a lot — your area could have a serious and potentially dangerous mosquito problem. •    prescription glasses: If you run out of contact solution or all the nastiness in the air after a storm irritates you, you’ll have back-up glasses. •    Adhesive tape: You can use this to fasten bandages, hold large lacerations together and even splint broken bones. •    Gauze, bandages and band-aids: Even little cuts and scrapes need to be dressed, so have a range of bandages on hand. •    Hand sanitizer: Nothing compares to soap and water, but in a fix, hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol will help. •    Sunscreen: If you have to evacuate, take sunscreen with you in case you get stuck on the highway. Food and Water Know which foods to keep on hand during a storm. •    Food and water should last for 72 hours: Make sure you have enough supplies to last everyone in the house for at least 72... Read More

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Hurricane Preparedness 2011

As we near the business end of the hurricane season it seems timely to start posting some hurricane preparedness lists. I thought it would be good to start with just a general list of items to have on hand. General Supplies Use this list to help you collect items you’ll need during and after a storm. Pack a to-go bag: This overnight bag should be easy to take with you if you have to evacuate in a hurry and should include a change of clothes, bottled water, flashlight and important documents. Cash: ATMs and credit card machines may not work for a while after the storm. Battery-operated radio: Make sure you have extra batteries too, so that you can keep up with news reports and alerts. Hand-crank radios work well, too. Secure a two-week supply of prescription medicine: Anyone on prescription medications, as well as pregnant women, should pack a two-week supply of their meds in a sealable plastic bag, clearly labeled. Include instructions for taking the medications, too. Flashlight and lanterns: Make sure you have a couple of flashlights, candles, matches, lanterns and other alternate sources of light. Personal hygiene items: It might be hard to get to the store to buy toilet paper, tissues, soap and other sanitary items after the storm. Extra keys: Having an extra set of keys in your kit is a good idea in... Read More

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Vacating your Florida Home for the Season – A Checklist

The below checklist is designed to aid in preparations to close your Florida home for the season. Some procedures may apply to your situation, others may not. Use this list as a guide to check off those tasks of greatest concern to you. 3 Weeks Prior to Leaving:
  • Have your air conditioning system serviced and humidistat calibrated, if present.
  • Call telephone company to temporarily suspend service during your absence.
  • Review homeowners insurance policy and update, if necessary.
  • Determine what method(s) you will use to control humidity inside your home and/or control fungal growth.
  • Make arrangements for a trusted friend/relative or hire a service to check on your home periodically.
  • Arrange for landscaping / pool maintenance.
  • Arrange for someone to secure shutters and/or prepare home in the event of a hurricane threat.
2 Weeks Prior to Leaving:
  • Purchase timers for lamps, radio or other appliances.
  • Arrange to forward mail.
  • Arrange for cancellation of newspapers, magazines.
  • Run air conditioning on humidistat settings to test reliability. It should run at least two out of every 24 hours.
1 Week Prior to Leaving:
  • Clean refrigerator and freezer.
  • Check operation of dehumidifier, if you use one.
  • Place in central location.
  • Remove interior plants... Read More

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